Lake Arrowhead Lessons

 

I Was Young in the Mountains Too!

Purpose: To compare and contrast students' young lives in the Lake Arrowhead communities with a story of growing up in the Appalachian Mountains.

Standards Addressed: 3.1 Students describe the physical and human geography and use maps, tables, graphs, photographs, and charts to organize information about people, places, and environments in a spatial context. 1. Identify geographical features in their local region (e.g., deserts, mountains, valleys, hills, coastal areas, oceans, lakes). 2. Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline).

Materials: When I Was Young In The Mountains by Cynthia Rylant (ISBN# : 0-525-44198-0). Paper, pencils, and crayons for each student.

Procedure: After students have read about Lake Arrowhead's history in the Virtual Museum, the teacher reads Rylant's story aloud to the class. Students are then invited to discuss and/or brainstorm the differences between being young in the San Bernardino Mountains versus the Appalachian Mountains. Using Rylant's book as a pattern, students write and illustrate their own " When I Was Young in the Mountains" story, either as a group or individually.

 

Black Annie and the Steam Shovel

Steam shovel used in the construction of Lake Arrowhead, courtesy of the Rim of the World Historical Society.

Purpose: To become familiar with the geographical themes of place, human/environment interaction and movement.

Standards Addressed:  3.1.1. Identify geographical features in their local region (e.g., deserts, mountains, valleys, hills, coastal areas, oceans, lakes). 3.1.2. Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline). 3.3 Students draw from historical and community resources to organize the sequence of local historical events and describe how each period of settlement left its mark on the land. 3.3.2. Describe the economies established by settlers and their influence on the present-day economy, with emphasis on the importance of private property and entrepreneurship. 3.3.3. Trace why their community was established, how individuals and families contributed to its founding and development, and how the community has changed over time, drawing on maps, photographs, oral histories, letters, newspapers, and other primary sources. 3.5.1. Describe the ways in which local producers have used and are using natural resources, human resources, and capital resources to produce goods and services in the past and the present.

Materials: Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel, by Virginia Lee Burton (ISBN#: 0-590-75803-9). Pencils, crayons, and construction paper for each student.

Procedure: Students become familiar with the Lake Arrowhead pages on the Virtual Museum website, especially the section refering to the Lake's construction. Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel is then read, and students will discuss, compare, and contrast the characterististics of Mike's Mary Anne with Lake Arrowhead's steam shovel. Students then create a pop-up card/diorama illustrating the shovel digging the basin of Lake Arrowhead.

Extension: Have students identify the many simple machines they see in the picture of Mary Anne or the Lake Arrowhead shovel (levers, pulleys, wheels and axles, etc.). Point out that both are examples of a compound machine; a machine comprised of one or more simple machines.

 

I Love LA! (Lake Arrowhead, that is)

Purpose: To identify the attributes of Lake Arrowhead which students appreciate most, and write a class song to the melody of Randy Neuman's song, I Love L.A.

Standards Addressed:  3.1.1 Identify geographical features in their local region (e.g., deserts, mountains, valleys, hills, coastal areas, oceans, lakes). 3.1.2. Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline). 3.3 Students draw from historical and community resources to organize the sequence of local historical events and describe how each period of settlement left its mark on the land.

Materials: Recording of I Love L.A., by Randy Newman, paper and pencil

Procedure: After listening to Newman's song, a discussion is initiated about the things students love in Lake Arrowhead. The class brainstorms ideas, with the teacher recording their remarks. Playing the song in short sections, the class will rewrite the song as a group, this time relating it to Lake Arrowhead.

 

Up the Hill!

Purpose: To familiarize students with the history of Lake Arrowhead and Highway 18.

Standards Addressed:  3.1.1 Identify geographical features in their local region (e.g., deserts, mountains, valleys, hills, coastal areas, oceans, lakes). 3.1.2. Trace the ways in which people have used the resources of the local region and modified the physical environment (e.g., a dam constructed upstream changed a river or coastline). 3.3 Students draw from historical and community resources to organize the sequence of local historical events and describe how each period of settlement left its mark on the land.

Materials: Up the Hill! game board, dice or spinner, game tokens

Procedure: Students roll dice to determine first player. High number goes first, followed by the other students in clockwise order. In turn, each player rolls the dice to determine number of steps. The first player to make it to the finish "tent" is the winner.

 

Lake Arrowhead: Flip Book

Purpose: Assessment and valuation of students' knowledge of Lake Arrowhead's history, as contained on this website.

Materials: Four sheets 9" X 12" sheets of white or manila colored construction paper per student.

Procedure: Stack the sheets of paper on top of each other horizontally neatly, with top and bottom edges aligned. Pull the sheets apart slightly, so that each is about one inch to the right of the one directly above it. Holding the top and bottom edges together, fold down until paper overlaps itself in a step-like fashion. Staple along the fold. The first step/page will be the cover page. Label subsequent pages as follows: Geology, Plants, Animals, Rock Camp, Little Bear Valley, Timber Times, and Lake Arrowhead. Below the fold on each page students will write a summary of what they've learned. Above the fold, students will illustrate their summary.

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