IMPORTANT EVENTS
CONSTITUTION &
BILL OF RIGHTS
MISSOURI COMPROMISE
CIVIL WAR & 13TH and 14TH AMENDMENTS
DRED SCOTT
BROWN VS. THE BOARD OF EDUCATION
BAKKE DECISION
PLESSY VS. FERGUSON
PROPOSITION 209
WORLD WAR II
INTERVIEWS
INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEWS
CARL CLEMMONS
MASAKO HIRATA
IRENE LEON
INFORMATION
DICTIONARY
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DRED SCOTT VS. SANFORD 1857

In 1846, Dred Scott, a slave, sued in a Missouri court for his freedom from his master. Scott argued that his service for Dr. Emerson in Illinois, a state from which slavery has been excluded by the Missouri Compromise, made him a free man. Eventually, the case reached the Supreme Court made of nine judges who interpreted the Constitution in regards to cases. At that time the court reflected the attitudes of the time and in a 7-2 decision ruled against Scott. The most important point in this case was that blacks were not considered people but property and since they were property they could not petition for rights. Chief Justice Taney wrote that it was "too clear to dispute, that the enslaved African race were not intended" by the men that signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to be included as citizens of the nation they sought to establish.

Scott lost the case but this further separated the northern and southern states. Slavery was the foundation of southern economy and society. The north was effected by the growing abolitionist and universal movement against slavery. The Dred Scott case only added to the growing anti-slavery movement and divisions between the two regions of the United
States.







Copyright ©2000 SCORE. Silvia Salem, San Bernardino City Schools Unified School District