IMPORTANT EVENTS
CONSTITUTION &
BILL OF RIGHTS
MISSOURI COMPROMISE
CIVIL WAR & 13TH and 14TH AMENDMENTS
DRED SCOTT
BROWN VS. THE BOARD OF EDUCATION
BAKKE DECISION
PLESSY VS. FERGUSON
PROPOSITION 209
WORLD WAR II
INTERVIEWS
INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEWS
CARL CLEMMONS
MASAKO HIRATA
IRENE LEON
INFORMATION
DICTIONARY
TEACHER PAGE
SAMPLE INTERVIEW PAGE



BROWN VS. THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 1954

The Supreme Court ruled against the "seperate but equal" descision of Plessy vs. Ferguson when it decided in favor of Brown vs. the Board of Education. Linda Brown was a young school girl attending a segregated school in Topeka, Kansas. Although she lived only four blocks from a public school she could not attend it because it was for "whites only" and she was bused to a "blacks only" school five miles away. Her parents and others filed a class action lawsuit and won. Testimony from psychologist Kennth B. Clark conducted research with young black school age children and discussed the feeling of inferiority that segregation influenced. Clark also said that segregation had a "detrimental effect on personaility development and diminshed the motivation to learn". This had a tremendous impact on the court's decision of the case. The nine justices decided that it was necessary to look beyond the tangibles ( teachers, equipment, etc) to the effects of seperation and decided that segregated schools were "inherently unequal". The importance of this decision was that it was a unanimous one, all nine justices, led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, voted the same. This was a strong statement compared to previous decisions on civil rights and it was this unamious voice that also led to a large scale enforcement of civil rights in the United States.