Questioning The Author: Discussion Moves

Marking
Drawing attention to an idea that has come up in order to emphasize its importance.

Example:

Turning Back To Students
Turning responsibility back to students for thinking through and figuring out ideas.

Example:

Turning Back To Text
Turning students' attention back to the text as a source for clarifying their thinking.

Example:

Revoicing
Interpreting what students are struggling to express and rephrasing the ideas so that they can become part of the discussion.

Example:

Modeling
Making public some of the processes in which readers engage in the course of reading.

Example (affective response):

Example (response to confusing text):

Annotating
Providing information to fill in gaps or point out sources of confusion in a discussion (filling in information gaps and/or pointing out sources of confusion).

Recapping
Reviewing and highlighting the major ideas and understandings learned so far.

Source: The Write Group “Questioning the Author” participant manual based on Questioning the Author by Isabel Beck, Ph.D., and Margaret McKeown, Ph.D.


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