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27 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 1b, Declaration of Independence and Natural Law
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Declaring Independence - Drafting the Documents

http://lcweb.loc.gov/exhibits/declara/declara1.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This exhibition from the Library of Congress has a chronology of events, pictures and a description of each draft of the Declaration of Independence. Standards 8.1.2, 5.5.3, and 10.2.2

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Resource ID: 913

Jefferson's Home: Monticello

http://www.monticello.org/index.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: Join this virtual tour of Monticello and explore "A Day in the life of Thomas Jefferson." Standards 2.5, 3.4.6, 5.5.4, and 8.2.5

Comments: This is an excellent site to explore Jefferson's life, including his contribution to US history as well as his living quarters

Resource Type: True.

Resource ID: 1812

MayflowerHistory.com

http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This is a complete site with history of the Mayflower, and inventory, passenger lists, and primary documents such as the Mayflower Compact and Thanksgiving Proclamation. The sections of the site devoted to the Mayflower Compact (1620), Peace Treaty with Massasoit (1621), Peirce Patent (1621), Division of Land (1623), Division of Cattle (1627), and the Pilgrim-related Leyden Documents are particularly helpful in learning Standards 5.3.2, 8.2.1 and 11.3.1.

Comments: Teachers, take a look at the Thanksgiving on the Net site at http://www.holidays.net/thanksgiving/ for a discussion of the National Day of Mourning to which Mr. Johnson refers.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2130

The Terrible Transformation

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/tguide/1index.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: At the beginning of the 17th century, both rich and poor Britons see the newly established American colonies as the land of opportunity. As changes in England's economy and word of hardships in America stem the flow of white bond servants, English planters bring more enslaved Africans to America to raise their profitable tobacco, sugar, and rice crops and to provide other forms of labor in the North. Gradually, laws are enacted that define legal status by race, ensuring that Africans and their descendants will be slaves. Resistance leads to rebellions in South Carolina and New York. The impact of slavery is felt by everyone -- North and South, black and white, the enslaved and the enslaver. Standards 5.4.6 and 8.2.3

Comments: This site accompanies the PBS Africans in America series, segment number one.

Resource Type: True.

Resource ID: 3093

Users Guide to the Declaration of Independence

http://www.founding.com/home.htm

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This site by the Claremont Institute focuses on the Declaration of Independence and other founding documents, asking key questions to guide readers to understanding. What is so special about the Declaration of Independence? What Do the Ideas of the Declaration Mean for Individual Citizens? Do the Principles of the Declaration Include Us All? What is equality? Does Equality Mean Equal in All Respects? Equality of Rights: What is the Basis of Human Equality? What Is a Right and What is Not? and Are there Natural Rights Other than those Listed in the Declaration? Standards 5.5.3, 8.1.2, 10.2.2, 11.1.0, and 12.1.3 civics

Comments: This site can be studied on different levels. Its essays Race and the American Founding, Property Rights and the American Founding, Property Requirements for Voting and the American Founding, Immigration Restrictions and the American Founding, and Religion and the American Founding can guide a whole course in American history at middle or high school.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 1283

A New System of Government

http://www.learner.org/biographyofamerica/prog05/index.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This Biography of America website describes the struggle of early America to create a new government and a constitution. Learn about the conflicting ideas of Jefferson and Hamilton and decide which has had the most lasting impact. There is a map, a primary source picture, an interactive timeline and the transcript of the video on which the site is based. Standards 5.5.4, 5.7, 8.3.4, 11.1.2, and 12.1.3

Comments: The Webography links to some excellent support material. The reading level is a bit high for grade 5 but it will be very useful at grades 8, 11 and 12.

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 34

Archiving Early America: Historic Documents from 18th Century America

http://earlyamerica.com/

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This reference resource has 18th century classified ads, historical maps and documents of consequence, a moderated forum for early American history and a monthly contest with a contest question archive. Standards 5.4.0, 5.5.0, 5.6.0 5.7.0, 8.1.0, 8.1.2, 8.2.1, 8.2.2, and 11.1.0 .

Comments: The ads are distracting.

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Resource ID: 293

Declaration of Independence

http://www.cs.indiana.edu/statecraft/decl.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This is a primary source document showing America's Declaration of Independence. Standards 3.4.3, 5.5.1, 5.5.3, 7.11.4, 8.2.1, 8.2.2, 10.2.2, 11.1.2, and 12.2.1 civics

Comments: Required reading under AB3086.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Resource ID: 910

Declaration of Independence - 1776

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/content.php?page=document&doc=2

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Although the section of the Lee Resolution dealing with independence was not adopted until July 2, 1776, on June 10th the Continental Congress appointed a committee of five to draft a statement of independence for the colonies. The committee included Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Robert R. Livingston, and Roger Sherman, with the actual writing delegated to Jefferson. Here is what they wrote. Here is an introduction, a transcript, and a printable version in handwriting of the Declaration of Independence. Standards 3.4.3, 5.5.3, 8.1.2, 10.2.2, 11.1.1 and 12.1.3

Comments: A high bandwidth connection is necessary to download the facsimile copy. This document is part of the Our Documents Project and a graduation requirement in California.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 904

Declaration of Independence and Natural Rights

http://www.crf-usa.org/bria/bria16_4.htm#natural

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness -- Where did Thomas Jefferson get the ideas in the Declaration of Indpendence? Where did the belief in Natural Rights come from in early American thinking? Standards 8.1.2, 10.2.1, and 11.1.2

Comments: This CRF publication also has discussion questions and a brief classroom activity.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 905

27 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 1b, Declaration of Independence and Natural Law
<-- Previous | Next -->

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