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10 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 1a, Colonial Heritage and American Democracy
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Fundamental Orders, The

http://www.constitution.org/bcp/fo_1639.htm

Rating: 2, High!

Description: In the spring of 1638 three Connecticut towns chose representatives and held a general court at Hartford. At its opening session the Reverend Thomas Hooker preached a powerful sermon on the text that "the foundation of authority is laid in the free consent of the people." On January 24, 1639, the constitution given here was adopted by the freemen of the three towns assembled at Hartford, and is usually named The Fundamental Orders. Nowhere in this great document is there a reference to "our dread Sovereign" or "our gracious Lord the King," -- nor to any government or power outside of Connecticut itself. It did not even limit the vote to members of Puritan congregations. In all history this is the first written constitution that created a government, and it is easily seen to be the prototype of our Federal Constitution, adopted exactly one hundred and fifty years later. However, see also the Iroquois Constitution and the Mayflower Compact of earlier times. Standard 8.1.1, 8.2.1, and 11.3.1

Comments: The numbered paragraphs in this Constitution Society site make this easier to use in the classroom and to divide the reading into small sections for student groups.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 1322

Religion and Revolution

http://www.wfu.edu/~matthetl/perspectives/five.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This is the text of a second lecture by historian Terry Matthews at Wake Forest University describing connections between religious beliefs of the day and the American Revolution. Matthews argues here that the Declaration of Independence was a religious document. The religion that infused it was Deism. This was clear in its assertion of inherent rights that can be intuited by human reason. Deism was the religion of the Enlightenment with its emphasis on the human ability to shape and order society into a harmonious and prosperous civilization. Matthews also says that the idea of a compact between the governed and government was little more than a secular version of Calvinist Covenant Theology.Standards 8.1.1, 10.1.1, 11.1.2, and 11.3.1

Comments: This is very difficult-to-find information in a readable format.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2613

The Great Awakening

http://www.wfu.edu/~matthetl/perspectives/four.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This is a lecture by historian Terry Matthews at Wake Forest University describing the ideas and the leaders of The Great Awakeing. The nine results of the Great Awakening listed on this site show the relationship between religion and events in early American history. Standards 8.1.1 and 11.3.2

Comments: The writing is very clear but the white on blue make printig for classroom use somewhat difficult.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3015

African Slavery in America by Thomas Paine (1774)

http://www.libertystory.net/LSDOCPAINESLAVERY.htm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: Here is the full text of the essay by Paine which was originally published in the Pennsylvania Journal and Weekly Advertiser on March 8th 1775. Paine was a member of the first anti-slavery society in America which was founded shortly after the writing of this piece. The article describes the practices of African American slavery in the late 1700's and argues against the injustices of them on religious and moral grounds. Note Paine's use of the same arguments that he used to support colonial freedom such as "As these people are not convicted of forfeiting freedom, they have still a natural, perfect right to it..." Standards 8.1.2, 8.9.1, and 11.1.2

Comments: The text only grey-backgrounded site is offputting but the philosophy of abolition it describes is well worth the read. Standards 8.1.2 and 11.1.1

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 110

First Great Awakening

http://www.nhc.rtp.nc.us/tserve/eighteen/ekeyinfo/grawaken.htm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: What historians call "the first Great Awakening" can best be described as a revitalization of religious piety that swept through the American colonies between the 1730s and the 1770s. That revival was part of a much broader movement, an evangelical upsurge taking place simultaneously on the other side of the Atlantic, most notably in England, Scotland, and Germany. In all these Protestant cultures during the middle decades of the eighteenth century, a new Age of Faith rose to counter the currents of the Age of Enlightenment, to reaffirm the view that being truly religious meant trusting the heart rather than the head, prizing feeling more than thinking, and relying on biblical revelation rather than human reason. Standards 8.1.1 and 11.3.2

Comments: This is part of the highly regarded Divining of America site.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 1233

Religion and Revolution

http://www.history.org/Almanack/life/religion/religionrev.cfm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: In the 18th century, Virginia authorities tolerated small numbers of dissenters from the Church of England who agreed to register with the courts and obtain required licenses. In the 1750s and '60s, evangelical Presbyterians and Baptists became less and less willing to be constrained by rules that advantaged the Church of England in the colony. They precipitated a struggle for religious freedom that challenged the centralized church and the power of the Enlish king to establish it. Standards 8.1.1 and 11.3.2

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2612

Role of African Americans in the American Revolution

http://afroamhistory.about.com/library/prm/blforgottenpatriots1.htm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: African American soldiers were on both sides and brought new hopes for freedom to many. Standard 5.6.7 and 8.1.2

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 2656

Samuel Adams: The Rights of the Colonists

http://history.hanover.edu/texts/adamss.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: These rights were part of a report to the Committee of Correspondence in 1772. The rights of colonists according to Samuel Adams included a right to life, to liberty, and to property, together with the right to support and defend them in the best manner they can. He saw these as branches of the duty of self-preservation, commonly called the first law of nature. All men have a right to remain in a state of nature as long as they please; and in case of intolerable oppression, civil or religious, to leave the society they belong to, and enter into another. Further he stated that when men enter into society, it is by voluntary consent; and they have a right to demand and insist upon the performance of such conditions and previous limitations as form an equitable original compact. Standards 5.5.1, 5.5.4, and 8.1.2

Comments: Compare the words here with those in the Declaration of Indpendence.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2691

Thomas Hooker

http://www.britannia.com/bios/hooker.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: Thomas Hooker arrived in Massachusetts in 1633. For a time Thomas and his family settled there while he served as the pastor of the 8th church in that colony. The civil situation was not completely harmonious between the leaders. John Cotton, another leader, wanted to set up a community in which only men who were members of the church and held property could vote. Thomas Hooker, like Cotton, wanted to build a godly community, but he believed all the men should have a voice and a vote. Standards 5.4.3, 5.4.4, 8.1.1, and 11.3.1

Comments: This brief article is from Britannia Biographies.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3136

Thomas Paine - Common Sense 1776

http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/D/1776-1800/paine/CM/sensexx.htm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: This html version of Common Sense has pictures of Thomas Paine and is broken into sections for easier access. It is hard to over state the importance of Paine's arguments in laying the case for the American Revolution and for stating the direction for the new government in America. Standards 7.11.6, 8.1.2, 11.1.1, and 11.1.2

Comments: Sections of this document may be excerpted for classroom analysis.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3146

10 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 1a, Colonial Heritage and American Democracy
<-- Previous | Next -->

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