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50 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 11, Unit 10a, The Civil Rights Movement in the Postwar Era
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Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail--a Rhetorical Analysis

http://faculty.deanza.fhda.edu/schultzmary/stories/storyReader$884

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This colorful rendition of the Letter from a Birmingham Jail analyzes King's words line-by-line by the type of argument he is making: Purple: the opposition's arguments; Red: use of an emotional appeal or pathos; Green: use of appeal to authority or reputation or ethos; and Blue: use of an appeal to logic or logos. Standard 11.10.5

Comments: This is a valuable resource for a humanities classroom and is a technique that could be applied by students to other famous speeches.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 2109

The Berkeley Free Speech Movement: Civil Disobedience on Campus

http://www.crf-usa.org/bria/bria16_3.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: The Berkeley Free Speech Movement was one of the first of the 1960s university student protests that challenged authority and criticized the way things were. This Constitutional Rgiths Foundation article outlines the issues and the history of this pivotal event in the Civil Rights Movement. There are discussion questions and a 1996 extension of the issues. Standard 11.10.5 and 12.2.1 civics

Comments: This article is well written and aligns well with California History-Social Science Content Standards.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2967

The Whole World Was Watching: An Oral History of 1968

http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/1968/

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: In this oral history project directed by Brown University, students from South Kingston High School interviewed a diverse body of Rhode Islanders about what they remember of the year 1968. Topics include the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights Movement, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy, and women's issues. The timeline has hot links to web resources about people and events of the era. Standards 11.9.3, 11.9.4 and 11.10.4

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3115

Tumultuous 1960s

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module21/index.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This overview of the 1960s by Gilder Lehrman has essays written for students and teachers on an arrary of topics from the era including: Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, Eisenhower and Civil Rights, Little Rock, the March on Washington, the Civl Rights and Voting Rights Acts, Women's Liberation, the Equal Rights Amendment, the LaRaza and Native American Power Movements, and environment. Standard 11.10.3, 11.10.4, 11.10.5, 11.10.6, and 11.10.7

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3722

A Year of Progress: Kennedy and Civil Rights

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/collection/docs_archive/docs_archive_RobertKennedy.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Examine the progress of the Civil Rights Movement from the leaders of the time in this report by Robert F. Kennedy on January 24, 1963, which he wrote as Attorney General to the President, his brother John F. Kennedy. Though the year was marked by the deadly riots at the University of Mississippi over the admittance of a black student, Kennedy maintains a sense of optimism and hope for the future. He does not deny that many difficult problems remain, and cites the disregard of voting rights and regulations in some Southern states as a continuing problem desperately in need of reform. However, Kennedy also notes progress made in African American employment and the desegregation of schools and public transportation. For these gains he credits the increasing cooperation of the Southern people and calls this "the emerging spirit of the South." Standard 11.10.2

Comments: This Gilder Lehrman page has an introduction to the letter, a facsimile, and a transcript.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3741

Amendments to the U.S. Constitution

http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.table.html#amendments

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Which of these amendments address social issues of 19th century America? Standards 8.2.6, 8.2.7, 8.11.5, and 11.10.7

Comments: Required reading under AB3086.

Resource Type: Compilation of Links.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 159

Brown v. Board of Education

http://www.watson.org/~lisa/blackhistory/early-civilrights/brown.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Read the background and decision in this landmark Supreme Court case involving school segregation. See the power of legal precedent that is set by Supreme Court rulings on lower court rulings, in this case Plessy v Feguson that allowed segregation in schools. Standards 11.10.2 and 12.5.4

Comments: This case is referred to in the standards.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 459

Brown v. Board of Education (1954)

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=87

Rating: 2, High!

Description: On May 17, 1954, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren delivered the unanimous ruling in the landmark civil rights case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. In this milestone decision, the Supreme Court ruled that separating children in public schools on the basis of race was unconstitutional. It signaled the end of legalized racial segregation in the schools of the United States, overruling the "separate but equal" principle set forth in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson case. Standards 11.10.2 and 12.5.4

Comments: This Our Documents site has a facsimile of the original document, a transcription of it, and background information to help the reader put the document in context.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 457

Civil Rights Act (1964)

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=97

Rating: 2, High!

Description: In a nationally televised address on June 6, 1963, President John F. Kennedy urged the nation to take action toward guaranteeing equal treatment of every American regardless of race. Soon after, Kennedy proposed that Congress consider civil rights legislation that would address voting rights, public accommodations, school desegregation, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs, and more. Despite Kennedy's assassination in November of 1963, his proposal culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964, signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson just a few hours after Senate approval on July 2, 1964. The act outlawed segregation in businesses such as theaters, restaurants, and hotels. It banned discriminatory practices in employment and ended segregation in public places such as swimming pools, libraries, and public schools. This document was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. Standard 11.10.6, 11.11.2, and 12.7.8 civics

Comments: This Our Documents site has a facsimile of the original document, a transcription of it, and background information to help the reader put the document in context.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 716

Civil Rights Oral History Bibliography

http://www.usm.edu/crdp/html/bibliography.shtml

Rating: 2, High!

Description: A bibliography of Oral History Interviews on the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi.

Comments: Here are fascinating eyewitness accounts of the Civil Rights Movement in the US and the conditions that led to the Movement.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 717

50 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 11, Unit 10a, The Civil Rights Movement in the Postwar Era
<-- Previous | Next -->

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