masthead, closeup of compass

41 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 11, Unit 3, Religion and Society
<-- Previous | Next -->

17th c. America as a Religious Refuge: Persecution in America

http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01-2.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: This Library of Congress site features primary source documents related to religius persecution in 17th cnetury colonial America. Included is Roger Williams, Quakers, Jews, the Pennsylvaian Germans, Roman Catholics in Maryland, and the religious rules of the Virginia Anglicans. Standards 5.4.3 and 11.3.0

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 515

An Act for Establishing Religious Freedom

http://www.history.org/Almanack/life/religion/statute.cfm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: This bill, drafted by Thomas Jefferson in 1777, first appeared in the form of a broadside, printed in Williamsburg in 1779. It was later used to argue the merits of including religious liberty guarantees in the First Amendment of the Constitution. The only known copy of the original broadside belongs to the Boston Public Library. Standards 8.2.5 and 11.3.5

Comments: The vocabulary of this document is difficult and this is best read aloud by the teacher and used in class discussion.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 212

First Great Awakening

http://www.nhc.rtp.nc.us/tserve/eighteen/ekeyinfo/grawaken.htm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: What historians call "the first Great Awakening" can best be described as a revitalization of religious piety that swept through the American colonies between the 1730s and the 1770s. That revival was part of a much broader movement, an evangelical upsurge taking place simultaneously on the other side of the Atlantic, most notably in England, Scotland, and Germany. In all these Protestant cultures during the middle decades of the eighteenth century, a new Age of Faith rose to counter the currents of the Age of Enlightenment, to reaffirm the view that being truly religious meant trusting the heart rather than the head, prizing feeling more than thinking, and relying on biblical revelation rather than human reason. Standards 8.1.1 and 11.3.2

Comments: This is part of the highly regarded Divining of America site.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 1233

Immigration of Ethnic and Religious Groups

http://www.genealogy.com/00000359.html?Welcome=1052857644

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: Here are brief immigration summaries about dozens of ethnic and religious groups as well as addresses of contacts and sources. Standard 8.12.7 and 11.3.4

Comments: You must sift through the commercialization of this huge site to access the useful information on immigration and genealogical research.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 1696

John Winthrop: A Modell of Christian Charity (1630)

http://history.hanover.edu/texts/winthmod.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: Here John Winthrop describes the type of colony he is hoping to build in the New World. Standard 5.4.2, and 11.3.1

Comments: This writing is difficult for grade 5 but it might be interesting to pick out a paragraph or two to get the idea of Winthrop's goals for the colony. It will also be fun to change the spelling to modern form.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 1842

John Winthrop: An American Nehemiah

http://chi.gospelcom.net/GLIMPSEF/Glimpses/glmps022.shtml

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: This article from Glimpses, a magazine of the Christian History Institute, describes the underlying beliefs of John Winthrop and the migration of the Puritans to America. Winthrop's imagery of the settlement as the model Christian society, or a "city on a hill," is taken from Matthew 5:14. It became a motif that has inspired American literary and political thought into the twentieth century. From Winthrop and the Puritans, America inherited the idea that in some way this land was to be an example and beacon of light to the rest of the world. Standard 5.4.2 and 11.3.1

Comments: Fifth graders will need assistance with reading this article but Winthrop's ideals about the goal of America are important for students of all ages to understand.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 1843

New England Religious Leaders

http://www.bibliomania.com/Reference/Simonds/SHAL/p3-chap1.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: This site describes the beliefs of major New England religious leaders during the colonial period. Standard 11.3.1

Comments: This resource is too difficult for students, but it will help teachers provide the needed information for the third unit of study in Grade 5.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 2306

Religion and Revolution

http://www.history.org/Almanack/life/religion/religionrev.cfm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: In the 18th century, Virginia authorities tolerated small numbers of dissenters from the Church of England who agreed to register with the courts and obtain required licenses. In the 1750s and '60s, evangelical Presbyterians and Baptists became less and less willing to be constrained by rules that advantaged the Church of England in the colony. They precipitated a struggle for religious freedom that challenged the centralized church and the power of the Enlish king to establish it. Standards 8.1.1 and 11.3.2

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2612

The Dissenting Ethos

http://www.victorianweb.org/religion/larsen4.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: The gathered or free church concept is embedded in the history and self-identity of the Congregational and Baptist churches. Free church people have often embraced the goal of creating a Christian country. Even though they might reject church establishments in principle, they nevertheless often actively endeavour to see the influence of Christianity improve government, laws, state schools, and other public institutions. Standard 11.3.1

Comments: This essay by Timothy Larsen, Professor of Church History, Tyndale Seminary, Toronto.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2995

Thomas Hooker

http://www.britannia.com/bios/hooker.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: Thomas Hooker arrived in Massachusetts in 1633. For a time Thomas and his family settled there while he served as the pastor of the 8th church in that colony. The civil situation was not completely harmonious between the leaders. John Cotton, another leader, wanted to set up a community in which only men who were members of the church and held property could vote. Thomas Hooker, like Cotton, wanted to build a godly community, but he believed all the men should have a voice and a vote. Standards 5.4.3, 5.4.4, 8.1.1, and 11.3.1

Comments: This brief article is from Britannia Biographies.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3136

41 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 11, Unit 3, Religion and Society
<-- Previous | Next -->

Questions, comments, and suggestions may be addressed to webmaster@rims.k12.ca.us.

Resources on the SCORE H/SS pages were evaluated by history/social science leaders in California. Going beyond these links allows student access to unknown material. Each school site is responsible for evaluating resources for appropriateness in the local school community.

A Project of the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools.

Copyright © 1996-2008 SCORE H/SS. All Rights Reserved.