masthead, closeup of compass

38 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 10, Unit 3a, Industrial Revolutions
<-- Previous | Next -->

British Workshouses - Early Ways of Handling the Poor

http://www.workhouses.org.uk/

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Workhouses were first used by churches in the 1600s to provide relief for destitute people in England. Population increases and the enclosure of common land resulting from the agricultural revolution led to a rapid increase in the number of poor in the countryside. By the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act England and Wales were divided Into 15,000 parishes to form Poor Law Unions to run workhouses supervised by local Boards of Guardinas. The number of people housed in the workhouses grew tremendously during the early industrial revolution and was one of the few "safety nets" for the poor Irish during the potato famine. Learn about the life in workhouses here. Standards 10.3.3 and 10.3.4

Comments: If you are reading Oliver Twist, this site will background on the life in workhouses.

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 456

Child Labour Documents from England

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/IRchild.main.htm

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Here are primary resource documents on the subject of child labor in England are available from reformers, supporters, and workers. The site also include the texts of 19th century child labor laws and statistics. Standards 10.3.4 and 10.3.7

Comments: Students examining these documents may also want to search the Internet for information on child labor today.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 628

Cities of Today, Cities of Tomorrow

http://www.un.org/Pubs/CyberSchoolBus/habitat/index.asp

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This site has units describing the growth, expansion, and consequences of urbanization in history, with possible solutions. Text include city profiles, pictures, and activities for students. Meets Standard 8.12.5, 10.3.3, and 11.2.2

Comments: Part of U.N. Cyberschoolbus site.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 706

Dickens Electronic Archive

http://humwww.ucsc.edu/dickens/

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This site has a wealth of information for teaching about the life and times of Charles Dickens. It links to a virtual tour of his home and electronic books. Standard 10.3.7

Comments: A treasure of resources.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 939

Dickens Works

http://lang.nagoya-u.ac.jp/~matsuoka/CD-Works.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Here you can find anything you could possibly want to know about Charles Dickens' works. Standard 10.3.7

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 940

Edisonian

http://www.edisonian.com/

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This Virtual Museum by Aaron Brackett is not yet complete but has lots of primary source pictures of Edison's inventions, especially the light bulb. Standards 8.12.9 10.3.2

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 1038

Invention Dimension

http://web.mit.edu/invent/

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This MIT site features biographies of American inventors spanning a wide range of topics and time periods. A featured inventor description is added every week. Standards 8.12.9 and 10.3.2

Comments: There are also links to science-related sites for students.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 1761

Inventor's Finest Creation: Thomas Edison and the Making of a Myth

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~CLASS/am485_98/brady/Edison/edison.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This is an in-depth look at the life and owrk of Thomas Edison. It shows how his laboratory was organized and how he worked. It puts him in context of his time and how he is an example of the American immigrant ideal. Standards 8.12.9 and 10.3.2

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 1762

Life of Nineteenth-Century Workers

http://www.victorianweb.org/history/workers1.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: The Sadler Committee conducted interviews of factory workers in England (1831-32 parliamentary invistigation). These interviews bring to light child labor and harsh conditions. Standards 8.12.6, 8.3.4, 11.2.1, and 12.4.1 economics

Comments: Child labor in England: Interview questions and answers are easy to understand. No graphics.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 1985

Marching With "General Ludd": Machine Breaking in the Industrial Revolution

http://www.crf-usa.org/bria/bria17_2.htm#luddites

Rating: 2, High!

Description: In the early 1800s, machines began to radically change the lives of many English cloth workers. Skilled and proud of their handmade products, many workers revolted by smashing the machines that threatened their way of life. Lacking a central leader, the workers claimed to follow a mythical figure called "General Ludd," apparently named after an apprentice named Ned Ludd who once smashed a mechanical loom. Today, the term "Luddite" is still used to refer to people resisting technological change. Learn about the Luddites in this Constitutional Rights Foundation article. Standard 10.3.4

Comments: There are discussion questions at the end of the article and excerpts of words from primary source songs.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2087

38 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 10, Unit 3a, Industrial Revolutions
<-- Previous | Next -->

Questions, comments, and suggestions may be addressed to webmaster@rims.k12.ca.us.

Resources on the SCORE H/SS pages were evaluated by history/social science leaders in California. Going beyond these links allows student access to unknown material. Each school site is responsible for evaluating resources for appropriateness in the local school community.

A Project of the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools.

Copyright © 1996-2008 SCORE H/SS. All Rights Reserved.