masthead, closeup of compass

17 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 12b, Native American Policy
<-- Previous | Next -->

The West: 1862-1893

http://www.learner.org/biographyofamerica/prog16/feature/index_text.html

Rating: 2, High!

Description: The series of maps at this site really drive home the changes in the west and their influence on Indian Policy after the Civil War. This Biography of America site has a transcript of the historical video on which the site was built which discusses the impact of this rapid conquest of the interior of the U.S. on native peoples. There is also a timeline and a webography linking to other sources. Standards 8.12.1, 8.12.2 and 8.12.7

Comments: You need the Flash plugin to get the full advantage of the map series.

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3113

Treaty of Fort Laramie (1868)

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=42

Rating: 2, High!

Description: In the 19th century the American drive for expansion clashed violently with the Native American resolve to preserve their lands, sovereignty, and ways of life. This struggle over land defined relations between the U.S. Government and Native Americans throughout the era. In this treaty, signed on April 29, 1868, between the U.S. Government and the Sioux Nation, the United States recognized the Black Hills as part of the Great Sioux Reservation, set aside for exclusive use by the Sioux people. Standard 8.12.2

Comments: This Our Documents site has a facsimile of the original document, a transcription of it, and background information to help the reader put the document in context.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3202

Who Stole the Tee Pee?

http://www.nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/who_stole_the_teepee/indexfla.htm

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This is a virtual tour of the National Museum of the American Indian Exhibitions. "Who stole the tee pee?" is a question posed by artist George Littlechild. It's another way of asking, "What happened to our traditions?" Missionaries, soldiers, teachers, government officials, and social reformers took away much of Native culture. Did they steal the tee pee? Or did they create a situation in which some Indian ancestors were more than willing to give it up? Standard 8.12.2

Comments: Works by contemporary Native American artists help others understand the impact of Indian Policy on the life of an entire people.

Resource Type: Other.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3459

Guide to the Great Sioux Nation

http://www.travelsd.com/history/sioux/index.asp

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: This site, by Travel South Dakota, presents an overview of the Lakota tribes, with history, art, points of interest, and geography of the Great Sioux Nation. Standard 8.12.2

Comments: This overview is sympathic to the Native People but comes from a Euro-American perspective.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 1475

Massacre at Wounded Knee 1890

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/knee.htm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: This account of the Battle of Wounded Knee is on the Eye Witness webpage. This Eyewitness to a Massacre is by Philip Wells a mixed-blood Sioux who served as an interpreter for the Army. Standard 8.12.2

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2119

Sitting Bull

http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/people/s_z/sittingbull.htm

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: Sitting Bull was the great Sioux leader of the Hunkpapa Lakota Indians. He excelled in the virtues most admired by the Sioux: bravery, fortitude, wisdom and generosity. Standard 2.5 and 8.12.2

Comments: This is a brief entry to support the PBS series People of the West.

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 2776

Treaty of Greenville August 3, 1795

http://earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/milestones/greenville/index.html

Rating: 3, Medium.

Description: Here is the text of the Treaty between the U.S. and the tribes of Indians in the Ohio Valley after General Anthony Wayne defeated them in the Battle of Fallen Timbers. The tribes included the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pattawatimas, Miamis, Eel Rivers, Weas, Kickapoos, Piankeshaws, and Kaskaskias. The Treaty established a definite boundary between Indian lands and those lands open to white settlement. It is important to see the promises made by the parties in 1795 as a way to judge the promises kept in the 1800's. Standard 5.8.0, 8.8.2, and 8.12.2

Comments: This source is all text and will be more accessible to students if broken into sections.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3206

17 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 12b, Native American Policy
<-- Previous | Next -->

Questions, comments, and suggestions may be addressed to webmaster@rims.k12.ca.us.

Resources on the SCORE H/SS pages were evaluated by history/social science leaders in California. Going beyond these links allows student access to unknown material. Each school site is responsible for evaluating resources for appropriateness in the local school community.

A Project of the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools.

Copyright © 1996-2008 SCORE H/SS. All Rights Reserved.