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40 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 11, Reconstruction
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Pictorial History of Reconstruction

http://www.picturehistory.com/find/start/0?c=176;start=12

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This site has 100 pictures form the Reconstruction era showing major people, documents, and events. All digital images are available for download as jpeg files at 300 dpi of original size. Standards 8.11.2, 8.11.3, and 8.11.4

Resource Type: Photos or Pictures.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 2447

Reconstruction

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/teachers/module11/index.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This rich Gilder Lehrman site has historical overview information, primary source documents, visuals and other learning tools for an in-depth study of Reconstruction. Standard 8.11.0, 8.11.1, 8.11.3, and 8.11.5

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3708

Reconstruction and Its Aftermath

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aopart5.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This Library of Congress American Memory site on Reconstruction is broken into four parts: Forever Free, Black Exodus, Fruits of Reconstruction, and The Role of the Black Church, each with great information about post Civil War America. The primary source material is rich and well explained. Standards 8.11.1, 8.11.2. and 8.11.3

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3642

Slave Voices

http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/slavery/

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: Duke University offers this exhibition of electronic texts, "Third Person, First Person Slave Voices from the Special Collections Library." This site includes such works as "Black Southerners in the Old South, "The Slave Community" and "Caesar" which examines life histories of slaves from the late 18th century through the 19th century. Standard 8.7.4, and 8.11.4

Comments: This site contains valuable material on the slave culture.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 2784

The Constitution of the United States of America

http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.overview.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This Cornell Law School version of the Constitution is divided into sections by article and amendment. Each section is annotated to identify the contents of that part of the Constitution. Standards 5.7, 8.1, 8.2, 8.11, 11.1,11.7.5, 12.1, and 12.4

Comments: It is difficult to identify the standard for this document since it applies to so much of the H-SS curriculum. The ones listed here are only the most direct connection.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 2985

13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Abolition of Slavery (1865)

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=40

Rating: 2, High!

Description: The 13th amendment to the United States Constitution provides that "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction." It passed the Senate on April 8, 1864, and the House on January 31, 1865. On February 1, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln approved the Joint Resolution of Congress submitting the proposed amendment to the state legislatures. The necessary number of states ratified it by December 6, 1865. Standard 8.11.5

Comments: This Our Documents site has a facsimile of the original document, a transcription of it, and background information to help the reader put the document in context.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3

14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Civil Rights (1868)

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=43

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Following the Civil War, Congress submitted to the states three amendments as part of its Reconstruction program to guarantee equal civil and legal rights to black citizens. The major provision of the 14th amendment was to grant citizenship to "All persons born or naturalized in the United States," thereby granting citizenship to former slaves. Another equally important provision was the statement that "nor shall any state deprive any person of live, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws." The right to due process of law and equal protection of the law now applied to both the Federal and state governments. Standard 8.11.5

Comments: This Our Documents site has a facsimile of the original document, a transcription of it, and background information to help the reader put the document in context.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 5

15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution: Voting Rights (1870)

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=44

Rating: 2, High!

Description: To former abolitionists and to the Radical Republicans in Congress who fashioned Reconstruction after the Civil War, the 15th amendment, enacted in 1870, appeared to signify the fulfillment of all promises to African Americans. Set free by the 13th amendment, with citizenship guaranteed by the 14th amendment, black males were given the vote by the 15th amendment. Standard 8.11.5

Comments: This Our Documents site has a facsimile of the original document, a transcription of it, and background information to help the reader put the document in context.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 6

Amendments to the U.S. Constitution

http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.table.html#amendments

Rating: 2, High!

Description: Which of these amendments address social issues of 19th century America? Standards 8.2.6, 8.2.7, 8.11.5, and 11.10.7

Comments: Required reading under AB3086.

Resource Type: Compilation of Links.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 159

Archives of the West from 1877-1887

http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/resources/archives/seven/w67singl.htm

Rating: 2, High!

Description: This primary source site about Benjamin Singleton who started a settlement near Topeka Kansas in the late 1860's. This is his testimony before the Senate Select Committee Investigating the "Negro Exodus from the Southern States" in Washington, D. C., April 17, 1880. Standard 8.9.1

Comments: This is part of the PBS site "The West."

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 292

40 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 11, Reconstruction
<-- Previous | Next -->

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