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37 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 7, American South: 1800-1850
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Abolition 1830-1850

http://www.iath.virginia.edu/utc/abolitn/abhp.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This University of Virginia site chronicles the abolition movement from 1830-1850 through primary source images and texts. Included are resources about the colonization movement, abolitionism and women's rights, songs, slave narratives, writers of the time, and much more. Standards 8.7.2 and 8.9.1

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3615

African American Odyssey

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/aaohtml/exhibit/aointro.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This is an incredible Library of Congress exhibit on the African American experience in American history. This digital museum is divided in nine sections: Slavery--The Peculiar Institution; Free Blacks in the Antebellum Period; Abolition; The Civil War; Reconstruction; Booker T. Washington Era; World War I and Postwar Society; Depression, New Deal, and World War II; and Civil Rights. Standards 5.4.6, 8.6.4, 8.7.2, 8.7.4, 8.9 all, 8.10.5, 8.11 all, 11.10.1-4

Comments: This resource covers many standards but seeing these documents altogether provides a powerful look at the African American experience in the U.S.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 101

American Abolitionism

http://americanabolitionist.liberalarts.iupui.edu/

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: The American abolition campaign was one of the most important reform movements in United States history. This web site by Indiana University offers a number of resources for those interested in studying the American Abolitionist Movement. Standards 8.7.2, 8.9.1, and 8.9.5

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3616

Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate

http://www.henryclay.org/index.htm

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: Ashland was the home of The Great Compromiser, Henry Clay. Here you will find biographical information about Mr. Clay as well as a well-rounded presentation on his home in Kentucky. Learn what life was like in the South before the Civil War. Standard 8.7.3

Comments: The reading level may be high, especially in the biographical pages, but think of it as an opportunity for vocabulary enrichment.

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 322

Aunt Phillis's Cabin: or, Southern Life as It Is

http://www.iath.virginia.edu/utc/proslav/eastmanhp.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: According to contemporary notices, this was probably the best-selling "anti-Uncle Tom" novel. In most respects it is typical of the genre: it consists of a good deal of talk (often between slave owners and abolitionists) about the essential happiness of slaves in the South as compared to the inevitable sufferings of free blacks and the working classes in the North. Published in 1852, Aunt Phillis' Cabin's author, Mary Henderson Eastman was living in Washington, D.C. In the novel she identifies herself as a member of one of the First Families of Virginia, as a mother, and as a Christian. She quotes Uncle Tom's Cabin several times throughout the novel, to put her representation of slavery in direct opposition to Harriet Beecher Stowe's. Eastman's "Concluding Remarks" are a very unsentimental, even sarcastic critique of Stowe, but it is surprising how much the two texts have in common. Standard 8.7.3

Comments: It would be valuable to have students compare the descriptions of slavery in Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin and Eastman's Aunt Phillis' Cabin.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 3821

Black Resistance to Slavery in the United States

http://www.afro.com/history/slavery/main.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: Developed by the Afro-American Black History Museum, this site shows the harshness of slavery and the continuous efforts by the enslaved to fight for their freedom and resist capture. Standards 5.4.6 and 8.7.2

Comments: Use this material with sensitivity.

Resource Type: Secondary Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 407

Captive Passage

http://www.mariner.org/captivepassage/index.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This website by the Mariner's Museum desribes the trans-Atlantic slave trade including an overview of the commercial aspects and the acquisition of slaves, the departure from Africa, the Middle Passage, and the arrival in America. There is a significant level of detail that will address many student questions. Thumnail pictures allow for quick loading as well as expansion for whole class projection. Standards 7.11.2, 7.11.3, and 8.7.2

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 331

Church in the Southern Black Community

http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/index.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: The Church in the Southern Black Community

Comments: This digital set of primary sources was developed by the Documenting the American South at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 663

Documents in the History of Slavery

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/modules/slavery/documents.cfm?#top

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: Here is a selection of primary source material on 1. the middle passage 2. arrival in the new world 3. conditions of life under slavery 4. childhood in slavery 5. family life 6. religion and beliefs 7. punishment 8. resistance 9. flight and 10. emancipation. Each topic has an introduction and 4 to 10 dated primary sources on that topic. Standards 5.4.6, 8.7.2, 8.7.4, 8.9.1, and 8.9.3

Comments: This site was developed as part of Digital History.

Resource Type: Primary Source Text.

Graphics content: Low.

Resource ID: 970

Early Industrialization

http://invention.smithsonian.org/centerpieces/whole_cloth/u2ei/index.html

Rating: 1, Awesome!

Description: This Smithsonian site uses primary source pictures, patents, and documents to chronicle the early industrial revolution in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The link between the demand for raw material to feed the textile mills in the north and plantation system in the south is clearly made. Sections of the site are devoted to the invention of the cotton gin, water power, the issue of pollution, and the factory system of labor. Standards 8.6.1 and 8.7.1

Comments: There is a teacher section with backgroun information and a set of supporting lessons.

Resource Type: Mix of Text and Graphics.

Graphics content: High.

Resource ID: 3586

37 resources found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Rating then by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 7, American South: 1800-1850
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