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6 lessons found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Title...
Showing Grade 11, Unit 9i, The Vietnam War
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How and Why Did the Vietnam War Divide Americans?

http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/crossroads/sec4/Unit_11/Unit_XIQ4.html

Description: Examine seven divisive issues from the Vietnam War era including the draft, the use of napalm, My Lai, Kent State, and the Pentagon Papers. Draw political cartoons portraying how these issues were viewed by various factions in American society. You might want to follow up this activity with the writing prompt at http://ericir.syr.edu/Virtual/Lessons/crossroads/sec5/Unit_11/Unit_11L5.html Standards 11.9.3 and 11.9.4

Author: Council for Citizenship Education, Crossroads Curriculum

Lesson ID: 512

Living Vietnam Memorials: Exploring First-Hand Accounts of the Vietnam War, Both Overseas and At Home

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/specials/saigon/saigonlesson.html

Description: Examine the Vietnam War from first-hand accounts, both in Vietnam and on the home front. Review New York Times journalist Malcolm W. Browne's account of the fall of Saigon, interview adults about their recollections and the impact of the Vietnam War, and create first-person oral history narratives based solely on direct quotations from these interviews. Standard 11.9.3

Author: Alison Zimbalist, New York Times Learning Network

Lesson ID: 674

The Nuclear Game - How Close Was It?

http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/coldwar/G5/default.htm

Description: In the 1950s and 1960s people probably knew less than we do today about the nuclear weapons that existed and what their governments were doing about them. On the other hand people probably thought a lot more about nuclear war than we do today. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s there was a real fear of an all out nuclear war between the USA and the USSR which would devastate those countries and most of the rest of the world . In this Gallery from the Virtual Museum of the National Archive of the United Kingdom, you are going to try to understand how both ordinary people and politicians felt about nuclear weapons and the possibility of nuclear war in the 1950s and 1960s. We have 3 case studies which will help you to develop your own views on this matter and answer the Big Question: The Nuclear Game - How Close Was It? Standards 10.9.1, 11.9.4, and 12.7.8 civics

Author: LearningCurve, National Archives of the United Kingdom

Lesson ID: 1056

Vietnam Conflict, The

http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/crossroads/sec5/Unit_11/Unit_11L5.html

Description: The Vietnam Conflict, a bitter struggle between the "free world" and Communist powers for political control of Asia, led to profound and bitter division in the United States. Identify and explain the reasons for U.S. military failure in the fight against North Vietnam and the Vietcong, and for American political failure in the effort to build a stable anti-communist bulwark in South Vietnam. Standard 11.9.3

Author: Council for Citizenship Education, Crossroads Curriculum

Lesson ID: 1089

Vietnam: Do We Need a Mural?

http://students.itec.sfsu.edu/itec815/mcmullin/index.html

Description: The mayor of your town has announced a plan to hire a local artist to paint a large mural commemorating the Vietnam War on the side of the downtown public library. But the plan for a mural is causing a lot of controversy in your town. Some citizens don't want the mural at all. Other citizens have different opinions about what the mural should look like. Standards 11.9.3, 11.9.4 and 12.7.5

Author: Gerald McMullin, San Francisco State University

Lesson ID: 1184

Was Vietnam a Turning Point in the Cold War?

http://Learningcurve.pro.gov.uk/coldwar/G6/default.htm

Description: Why has a war in a small country in South East Asia become one of the most heavily researched wars of all time? It is difficult to say why, but there is no doubt that the Vietnam War raises a range of vital issues for historians. It was a war in which a giant superpower was unable to defeat a small, poor country. It was part of a wider pattern of Cold War conflict. It was covered by the media in great detail, so people knew more about this war than any previous one. It devastated Vietnam and divided the USA. In this gallery of the National Archive of the United Kingdom you are going to look at the policy aims of American Presidents toward Vietnam. You will also look at how Americans and the rest of the world saw US policy in Vietnam. We have 2 case studies which will help you to develop your own views on the Big Question - Was Vietnam a Turning Point in the Cold War? Standard 11.9.3

Author: National Archives of the United Kingdom, Learning Curve

Lesson ID: 1197

6 lessons found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Title...
Showing Grade 11, Unit 9i, The Vietnam War
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