masthead, closeup of compass

4 lessons found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Title...
Showing Grade 9, Unit 2, Physical Geography: Land Forms and Water
<-- Previous | Next -->

Whose Water Is It?

score logo from SCORE H/SS!

http://rims.k12.ca.us/activity/whosewater/index.html

Description: Students participating in this activity will investigate the controversy surrounding the damming of Hetch Hetchy Valley. They will also learn about water use in California and where the water in their community comes from. Standard 4.4.6 and 4.4.7

Author: David Hoffman, Madera County Office of Education

Lesson ID: 1260

Advertise with Geography...It's Free and It's Easy!

http://www.iupui.edu/~geni/lsort/advertis.html

Description: By reinforcing knowledge of regions within the United States, students will establish awareness of how landforms/landmarks produce a visual image of a region. They will demonstrate how advertisers use the "positive geographical image" to sell their product. The lesson resommends using magazine photos of regions but the Internet would be better. Try using pictures from http://www.ospi.wednet.edu:8001/curric/land/landform/landform.html

Author: David Harmon, Bridgepoint Elementary

Lesson ID: 27

Colorado River: Whose Water Is It Anyway?

http://www.udel.edu/inst/problems/colorado/index.html

Description: On December 18, 1997, U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt announced first-ever rules to permit interstate transfers of Colorado River water from agricultural users to urban users. He also strongly cautioned that much still needs to be done before California is in a position to live within its allocation of Colorado River water. "I believe the time has come for me as River Master to play a more active role," Babbitt said. Did he do the right thing? Standards 4.4.6 and 4.4.7 and 12.7.8

Author: Math and Science Education Resource Center, University of Delaware

Lesson ID: 240

Conservation Movement at a Crossroads: The Hetch Hetchy Controversy

http://memory.loc.gov/learn/lessons/97/conser1/xroads.html

Description: The debate over damming the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park marked a crossroads in the American conservation movement. Until this debate, conservationists seemed fairly united in their aims. San Francisco's need for a reliable water supply, along with a new political dynamic at the federal level, created a division between those committed to preserving the wilderness and those more interested in efficient management of its use. While this confrontation happened nearly one hundred years ago, it contains many of the same arguments which are used today whenever preservationists and conservationists mobilize. Standards 11.2.2, 11.2.6, 12.7.5, and 12.10

Author: Michael Federspiel and Timothy Hall, American Memory Project 1997

Lesson ID: 254

4 lessons found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Title...
Showing Grade 9, Unit 2, Physical Geography: Land Forms and Water
<-- Previous | Next -->

Questions, comments, and suggestions may be addressed to webmaster@rims.k12.ca.us.

Resources on the SCORE H/SS pages were evaluated by history/social science leaders in California. Going beyond these links allows student access to unknown material. Each school site is responsible for evaluating resources for appropriateness in the local school community.

A Project of the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools.

Copyright © 1996-2008 SCORE H/SS. All Rights Reserved.