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28 lessons found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 6, American Northeast: 1800-1850
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Comparative Labor Systems: Plantation Rules/Factory Rules

http://invention.smithsonian.org/centerpieces/whole_cloth/u2ei/index.html

Description: Using primary source materials and two essays, you will compare the rules governing work enforced on two plantations and in two factories during the 19th century. Compare: 1. the way time is organized on the plantation with the way time is organized in the factory 2. to whome the rules addressed The plantation rules contain more instructions for the care of slaves, as well as for the physical punishment of slaves, than the factory rules do. What does this tell us? How would you compare the factory and plantation rules to the rules of your school? Standards 8.6.1 and 8.7.2

Author: The Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, National Museum of American History

Lesson ID: 245

Emerson and Thoreau:

http://www.americanwriters.org/classroom/videolesson/vlp08_emerson.asp#

Description: Use these themes, questions and video clips from C-SPAN's American Writers program on learn about Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. The vieo clips and questions explore transcendentalist ideas on nature, civil disobedience, and American expansion. Standard 8.6.7

Author: C-SPAN American Writers

Lesson ID: 1571

Examining Transcendentalism through Popular Culture

http://readWriteThink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=320

Description: Using excerpts from the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, comics, and songs from different musical genres, students examine the characteristics of transcendentalism. In the course of their exploration, students use multiple genres to interpret social commentaries, to make connections among works they've studied in class, and to develop their own views on the subjects of individualism, nature, and passive resistance. The success of this lesson lies in the students' recognition that transcendentalism is not an archaic philosophy, but one that can be found in the various texts they see, hear, and read every day. Standard 8.6.7

Author: Sharon Webster, Narragansett, Rhode Island

Lesson ID: 371

Examining Transcendentalism through Popular Culture

http://www.readwritethink.org/lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=320

Description: Using excerpts from the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, comics, and songs from different musical genres, examine the characteristics of transcendentalism. In the course of your exploration, use multiple genres to interpret social commentaries, to make connections among works you've studied in class, and to develop your own views on the subjects of individualism, nature, and passive resistance. Teachers, the success of this lesson lies in the students' recognition that transcendentalism is not an archaic philosophy, but one that can be found in the various texts they see, hear, and read every day. Standard 8.6.7

Author: Read Write Think

Lesson ID: 1570

Freedom of Assembly

http://www.billofrightsinstitute.org/Instructional/Resources/Lessons/Lessons_List.asp?action=showDetails&id=98&ref=showCatD&catId=8

Description: In 1848, three hundred people exercised their First Amendment rights to peaceably assemble at the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Seneca Falls, New York. There, discussing the "social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman," the modern women's rights movement was born. This Bill of Rights eLesson spotlights how the First Amendment freedom of assembly can be key to bringing about change. Standards 8.6.6 and 11.10.7

Author: Bill of Rights Institute

Lesson ID: 1530

Gender Roles in the Mid-Nineteenth Century What Fiction Tells Us

http://lincoln.lib.niu.edu/teachers/women-gender-lesson1.html

Description: After reading the short story "The Daughter-in-Law" compare and contrast the moral qualities of characters. Generalize what appropriate middle-class gender-specific values were expected in the 19th century and analyze rationales for the creation of and the popularity of such stories. To show your understanding, create an etiquette guide describing appropriate gender behavior for men and women in the 19th century. Standard 8.6.6 and 8.6.7

Author: Tara L. Dirst, Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project

Lesson ID: 595

Petition of Amelia Bloomer Regarding Suffrage

http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/bloomer/

Description: Read a copy of the petition Amelia Bloomer wrote to Congress and a biographical entry for Bloomer such as the one in Notable American Women. Write an epitaph for Amelia Jenks Bloomer. The epitaph should capture Bloomer's role as a reformer of American political culture. Standards 8.6.6 and 11.10.7

Author: Linda Simmons, Northern Virginia Community College

Lesson ID: 813

Seneca Falls

http://static.ncss.org/files/lessons/CFSep95.pdf

Description: Analyze the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments. List the grievances of women in 1848. Write a letter to a suffragist explaining how times have changed in society since the 19th century. Don't have an online hook-up in your classroom? Here is a lesson you may print off for your class, complete with primary source documents. This lesson may be done by students at many age levels. Standards 8.6.6 and 11.10.7

Author: Jeannette Balantic, Andrea Libresco, and Milli-Ann Iuso-Cox, Social Education Magazine

Lesson ID: 939

The Declaration of Independence and Your Own Rights

http://www.teachervision.com/lesson-plans/lesson-1717.html

Description: Read the American Declaration of Independence and discuss the events that led to its writing. Identify the specific arguments for independence, for example, the king "called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their Public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures", the king "dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people." Then read the Declaration of Sentiments and discuss the forces that led Stanton to write it. How is this document similar to the Declaration of Independence? Why did these women feel their rights were being violated? Standards 5.5.3, 8.01.2 and 8.6.6

Author: Learning Network

Lesson ID: 1025

The Sargeant's Trench Trial: A Play About Waterpower

http://invention.smithsonian.org/centerpieces/whole_cloth/u2ei/u2materials/eiPac7.html

Description: You will perform a short play focusing on an 1826 courtroom drama in which characters explain the problems and changes brought by the new textile mill, particularly those related to the environment. You will see that problems of pollution have not been issues only of the 20th-21st centuries. Standard 8.6.1

Author: The Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, National Museum of American History

Lesson ID: 1077

28 lessons found; showing 10 per page, sorted by Title...
Showing Grade 8, Unit 6, American Northeast: 1800-1850
<-- Previous | Next -->

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